Game counts

Namibia's north-west game count
Namibia's north-west game count

Most conservancies conduct routine game censuses. The biggest of these is the North-West Game Count, conducted annually since 1999. The count includes all the conservancies and tourism concessions outside of national parks in the north-west and is the largest annual, road-based game count in the world. It covers an area of around seven million hectares and is undertaken as a joint exercise between conservancy members and staff, the MET and conservation NGOs.

Similar methodology has been extended to other parts of the country which also carry out annual game counts, but the application of approach has been adaped to local conditions. Conservancies in the east perform an annual moonlight waterhole count, while conservancies in the north-east undertake counts on foot along fixed transect lines. These counts amount to 2,500 kilometres walked annually. All census methods are intended to contribute to and work synergistically with other existing census methods, such as the aerial censuses conducted by the MET, and event book data collected daily and collated every month.

North East game count
North East game count
The north-east game count – on foot
The north-east game count – on foot

In large open areas where animals are free to roam, determining trends is challenging because animals can move into or out of the areas being monitored. In addition, in certain regions, and in particular in desert conditions, animal numbers are driven to a large extent by good and poor rainfall seasons leading to ‘boom and bust’ cycles in wildlife populations. These two factors make the analysis of trend data extremely challenging, particularly over the short-term, and a long-term view has to be taken.

Marienfluss Conservancy
Marienfluss Conservancy
Namibia’s game counts are scientifically based
Namibia’s game counts are scientifically based

Namibia’s game counts are scientifically based, and are designed to include conservancy members, NGO workers and MET rangers in a joint effort that generates both data and strengthens partnerships. The counts provide an idea of where game occurs, an approximate estimate of how many animals there are, but most importantly, they track changes (or trends) in population numbers over time. Figures for wildlife population estimates, which show long-term trends, are used as a key indicator of success or failure in conservation.

Wildlife movement in and out of game count areas (including trans-boundary movements to and from neighbouring countries, which has been actively recorded for some species through remote tracking) is the main explanation for significant annual fluctuations. The data also underlines the value of using different counting methods to gain a better understanding of wildlife dynamics.

Game count posters and reports can be downloaded from the Resources section of the NACSO website.

Aerial Censuses

Regular aerial censuses have been undertaken by the MET in different parts of Namibia. These confirm the long-term trend of wildlife population increases in both the north-west and north-east.

Aerial count
Aerial count

Elephant counts

The African Elephant Status Report for 2016, published by the IUCN using aerial and other census data from Namibia, estimated the population of elephants in Namibia at 22,754 ± 4,305, with a possible further 90 elephants in areas not systematically surveyed. Elephants occur across the north of Namibia, mostly in conservancy and national park areas. Their range of 164,069 km2, which is 20% of the country, includes the extremely arid north-west, the central savannah of Etosha, and the riverine and forested north-east. The report details four main populations, the largest being the transfrontier population moving through the Zambezi Region to and from Angola, Zambia and Zimbabwe (the KAZA area). Due to the transfrontier movement of elephants, numbers in this area make up the bulk of the Namibian population. Despite an upsurge in wildlife crime over recent years, the population has continued to grow, bringing increased opportunities for tourism-based income, but also increased human-wildlife conflict. Other populations occur in Khaudum National Park adjacent to Botswana, and in the north-west Kunene Region, sometimes referred to as ‘desert elephants’.

Elephant range in Namibia

The Event Book

The Event Book is used by community game guards to record suspected poaching incidents, human-wildlife conflict, and wildlife sightings.

This highly successful management tool was initiated in 2000 and has been continuously refined ever since. It is used by almost all registered conservancies and is systematically introduced to emerging conservancies during their formation. The simple but rigorous tool promotes conservancy involvement in the design, planning and implementation of natural resource monitoring and management.

The annual audit of the books produces data, which is used by the conservancy in its adaptive feedback management, is also sent to the MET and NACSO to update national data and produce trend analyses of monitored events.

A predator incident is entered into the Event Book
A predator incident is entered into the Event Book
The Event Book is used by community game guards
The Event Book is used by community game guards
Graphic columns show trends at a glance
Graphic columns show trends at a glance
Event Book
Yellow, blue and red books collate data daily, monthly and yearly, revealing trends in wildlife populations and human-wildlife conflict
This page was last updated on: 9th December 2019